Problem hidden
This problem was hidden by Editorial Board member probably because it has incorrect language version or invalid test data, or description of the problem is not clear.

FACTLENG - Factorial length

Given integer n, print length of n! (which is factorial of n).

Input

The first line of the standard input contains one integer t (t<10001) which is the number of test cases.

In each of the next t lines there is number n (0<=n<=5*10^9).

Output

For each test, print the length of n!.

Example

Input:
3
1
10
100
Output: 1
7
158


Added by:Piotr Ką…kol
Date:2009-12-26
Time limit:4.855s
Source limit:50000B
Memory limit:1536MB
Cluster: Cube (Intel G860)
Languages:All except: NODEJS OBJC SCM qobi VB.NET

hide comments
2013-08-28 07:56:05 Dominique VAILLANT
@Mitch: And now 52 in awk, absolute record! Rude awakening for me...
2013-08-27 13:19:58 Dominique VAILLANT
Wow! 86 in C. Hat's off to Grand Master Mitch!
2013-08-18 07:35:50 Raushan Kumar
simple formulae to get number of digits search it up
2012-01-28 17:18:12 Piotr KÄ…kol
@saurabh jain - Your PI value is not precise enough.
2012-01-24 18:22:50 Saurabh Jain
i dont know why it is showing WA for my code even after my answer matches with the highest value of n!! can u tell me the reason ?
2011-05-08 11:26:20 challenger
@HWK - Even if You just reached (not beat) "my" solution I could always disqualify it so that You would be the rightful leader of C in this task. ;-)
2011-05-07 20:29:26 HWK
@challenger: It's painful that you've pushed my "nice" C-solution to the second page of best solutions. :-)

Edit: Back again!

Last edit: 2011-05-08 08:39:09
2010-12-27 23:58:35 Marty OBrien
Thanks Piotr. That solution was OK when perl is built with 64-bit integers, but not with 32-bit.
2010-12-23 13:27:45 Piotr KÄ…kol
Yes, for 0! You should print 1.
Your mistake is that for bigger numbers You always print -1. Before submitting always check the hardest case. Here for 5*109 You should print 46323377618.
2010-12-22 20:10:04 Marty OBrien
Having trouble getting the right answer to this one. The length of 0! is 1, right?
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